Monday, June 27, 2016

A Longer Table

I thought this was a beautiful graphic about gratitude and happiness:

When you have more than what you need,
build a longer table,
not a higher fence.



I've seen the quote attributed to "David Wolfe," but I don't know if that is correct or not.

Saturday, June 25, 2016

The Present

The animation in this film is delightful... and the message is a beautiful one: be sure to watch through to the end!




You can learn more about the film at Jacob Frey's website, and here is the film's adorable little dog:



Thursday, June 23, 2016

Tomorrow's Pages

Since I like to write, that means I also like the metaphor of "the book of life" ... with pages that you have not yet written. Let them be happy pages!

You can't rewrite yesterday's pages,
but tomorrow's are blank,
and you have the pen . . .
. . . so, write something good.



Here's the graphic I saw at Twitter that inspired me; the image is from Wikimedia.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Small acts of kindness and love

Here is a fuller version of Gandalf's words (from J. R. R. Tolkien): “Some believe it is only great power that can hold evil in check, but that is not what I have found. It is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay. Small acts of kindness and love. Why Bilbo Baggins? Perhaps because I am afraid, and he gives me courage.”


Sunday, June 19, 2016

A Therapist's Prescription for Better Mental Health

I liked this graphic from SharonMartinCounseling.com. There is lots of good advice here. Maybe something here will suit whatever situation you are in!


Treat yourself with kindness. • Say "no" when you need to. • Step out of your comfort zone. • Don't compare yourself to others. • Embrace your mistakes; they don't define you. • Be truly present. • Get outside. • Cut yourself some slack. • Make rest a priority. • Make fun a priority, too. • Savor good memories. • Make new friends. • Laugh often. • Create something. • Anticipate joy. • Appreciate what you have. • Learn from your mistakes. • Write down your successes. • Clear out physical and emotional clutter. • Move your body more. • Pursue a hobby. • Put your phone down and connect with the people you're with. • Confide in trustworthy people. • Treat your mental health with the same importance as your physical health. • Slow down. • Ask for help when you need it. • You don't have to do it all; prioritize what matters most.


Tuesday, June 14, 2016

What do you know about it? (video)

This is a powerful empathy film! Be sure to turn on the CC (closed captions) in English so that you can follow along. You can see how that looks in the screenshot below.



When you turn on the closed captions, you'll see the English subtitles like in this screenshot:


Sunday, June 12, 2016

Procrastination Panda

You can make your own "Procrastination Panda" meme here: DIYLOL. I think these are so cute! Here are some that I found online:







Friday, June 3, 2016

Creating a Clearing

Stillness is not about focusing on nothingness. It's about creating a clearing. It's opening up an emotionally clutter-free space and allowing ourselves to feel and think and dream and question. — Brene Brown... see also here video on empathy!


Thursday, June 2, 2016

The Books We Leave Behind

This is a truly beautiful reflection on life, and a life of reading:

How I mourned my sister through the books she left behind... but in Emily's library, I also saw a life well lived.
by Tom Rachman (New York Times)

Here's a quote from the article to give you a sense of what it is like:
I kept about 250 volumes. The books sat on the floor behind me in my study, piled where my girlfriend and I had spent two afternoons writing “Emily Rachman” in the front of each, to ensure that they never just dissolve into my collection. Months passed before I could alphabetize hers among mine. My study remained impassable with Emily’s books. I devoted myself exclusively to reading as many as I could — an imagined dialogue, as happens whenever books are borrowed, one reader hearing the perceptions of who preceded. [...] When I left her apartment, the built-in bookshelves were empty but for the dust. What, I wonder, have the new owners placed there? Books? Something else altogether? They’ll never know the jubilation those shelves once brought to a young woman.